Belinda Taylor presents: Becoming Julia Morgan

A scene from Becoming Julia Morgan. William Randolph Hearst (Dave Garret), Julia Morgan (Janis Stevens), Marion Davies (Sally Clawson) in “Becoming Julia Morgan” at the Berkeley City Club, 2012. (Photo by Benjamin Privitt)

Award-winning play about California’s First Woman Architect

Becoming Julia Morgan by playwright Belinda Taylor has performed to sold-out houses in Sacramento, Sausalito, Berkeley and Asilomar, winning rave reviews and standing ovations.

Licensing rights to Becoming Julia Morgan are now available. Theaters interested in mounting a production should contact playwright Belinda Taylor at belindat@mac.com.

With a cast of just four actors playing 18 roles, Becoming Julia Morgan follows the architect’s life from 1931 to 1937 as she works for William Randolph Hearst building  San Simeon, runs a busy San Francisco architectural office, and encounters both a medical crisis and a personal crisis of confidence.  There are flashbacks to her student days at UC-Berkeley and Paris, insights into her personal relationships, her design philosophy, comic moments, appearances by two Roman Gods, one her muse and the other her nemesis, and a flash-forward to modern times. Modernism eclipsed Julia Morgan’s elegant style during her lifetime, which is part of the dramatic tension in the play.

Playwright Taylor explores this pioneering architect’s determination to stay out of the limelight – “I’m not one of those talking architects!” – and the equal determination of one young San Francisco Examiner reporter to persuade her to give up her secrets. The play gives a nod to the future when the enigmatic Miss Morgan receives due fame and acclaim as new generations discover her brilliance.

From the Sacramento Bee:

“Like a Julia Morgan-designed building, the new play about California’s first female architect … is a beautiful and intelligently designed creation. And also like her buildings, it is pleasing to the senses, with fine attention to detail and outstanding craftsmanship”

From the Contra Costa Times:

“Becoming Julia Morgan, a captivating local-girl-makes-good story,  told in a brisk, stylish production.”